St Patrick’s Church Murlog Donegal + Liam McCormick

Fragrant with Myrrh and Aloes and Cassia and Lavender

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Old Church Tower © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

Henry Mulholland, 4th Baron Dunleath, may have been referring to musical events but his erudite musings could easily apply to Murlog Church: “Excellence is not an exclusive right of the metropolis, quality is not necessarily governed by quantity and mood need not be dependent on magnificence.” Dedicated to St Patrick, this rural building is the epitome of restraint, of architecture and art pared down to elemental presence. It’s the second – and largest – of acclaimed architect Liam McCormick’s seven County Donegal churches. Two decades of building starting in 1955 produced Milford, Murlog, Desertegney, Burt, Creeslough, Glenties and finally Donoughmore.

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Old Tower © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

Liam’s patron at Murlog was Parish Priest Anthony McFeely, later Bishop of Raphoe. In 1959, prior to commencement of design, they set off on a mini Grand Tour visiting new churches in France, Germany and Switzerland. As a consequence, Ireland’s most northwesterly county was blessed with Continental influenced state of the heart ecclesiastical architecture. Liam described Father McFeely as, “A client who was not just precise about the brief but one who having reacted against the gimmickry in much contemporary Irish church architecture, made a point of going abroad to see the best European churches and assessing their spiritual quality.”

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Roof © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Side © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Gable © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Garden © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Bell Tower © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Spire © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Stained Glass © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

St Patrick's Church Murlog Window © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Roof Lantern © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Crucifix © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Baptismal Font © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

A green apron of gradient slopes down to the site along the road between Lifford and Raphoe. Like all his other Donegal churches (except Burt which is stone faced), Murlog is painted roughcast plaster (once white, now custard cream). A covered entrance walkway links the bell tower to the main body of the church. The architecture has a distinctly Continental appearance, defined by geometry rather than decoration. A stone tower in the car park is all that remains of the Victorian church.

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Tabernacle Vestibule © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

The layout is a variation of the traditional cruciform plan with splayed walls and chevron headed extremities drawing the congregation towards the altar. An octagonal roof lantern lights the crisscross of the nave and transepts. Liam selected six artists to work on the interior. Patrick McElroy, who designed the tabernacle and baptismal font cover, recalls, “He was like the conductor of an orchestra, and you had to fit in with his idea… he certainly wanted original works of art… you got your area where you were to work, and all the artists knew each other… and Liam became a great friend to us all. He was a great man for having a night out!” Patrick Pollen created the largest expanse of stained glass in any Liam McCormick church. The windows are chevron headed, reflecting the floor plan. Stripped of sensuous frills and casual thrills, the architecture and art work together towards a sacred Gesamtkunstwerk.

St Patrick's Church Murlog Donegal Tabernacle © Lavender's Blue Stuart Blakley

About Lavender's Blue

Snappy Wordsmith
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